Icelandic folklore

Icelandic folklore has close ties to the nature in Iceland with its 

Northern lights, magnificent waterfalls, intimidating glaciers and 
deadly volcanoes. The traditional folklore of iceland and the 
supernatural still plays a large role in the beliefs of many modern day 
Icelanders. 
Icelandic Elves are unlike any other elves, they are tall 
and slender and often wear green. They live in the landscape where they 
make their homes in rocks and large boulders, it may seem a 
contradiction but there are also several Elf churces here and there. 

Icelandic trolls have long been a part of Icelandic legends, they can be
 as big as houses or the size of an average man but they are always very
 strong and ugly, they tend to have magical abilities and help people. 

Ghosts in Iceland are tricksters, they can forget that they are dead and
 seem alive in all respects, they even start cooking food for guests if 
they feel so inclined. All these creatures have been part and parcel of 
Icelandic folklore scince the viking age, and thus, in some instances, 
allowances are still being made for the needs of these supernatural 
creatures.  

The dark winter is the best time to relish in Icelandic 
folklore, that is when the darkness comes alive and the Icelandic elves 
dance in the northern lights. It is also the time preperations are being
 made for the Icelandic christmas celebration and the Icleandic new 
year, a feast of light and colour like no other. At Christmas time 
Icelandic santas also come down from the mountains and give little 
presents to good little children. There are thirteen santas in Iceland 
each with a distinct personality and traits. They have grumpy parents 
and a man eating cat and a whole expended family of Icelandic trolls 
waiting for them in the mountains of Iceland. 
There are many wonderful things for tourists visiting Iceland over the holidays to do. Especially
 in Reykjavik where most of the people of Icleand live. If you want to 
come to Iceland during the Icelandic Christmas celebrations or spend the
 New year in Icleand make sure you book accommodations first because the
 place fills up as it draws closer to New Years eve. 

While many Icelanders do not actively believe in elves, trolls and ghosts, most 
modern-day residents are hesitant to deny their existance altogether. On
 Randburg you will find some information on icelandic folklore and 
traditions that may be surprising and interesting at the same time.

Hotels in Iceland


Basic Icelandic Folklore

There is a long tradition in Iceland of respecting nature and the elements. The Viking age settlers of Iceland came to the rugged island in the hopes of creating for themselves a better life, what they faced was a continuous struggle against the awesome powers of Mother Nature. Their reaction was to personify these forces, to give the elements human-like characteristics which could be “reasoned” with. Or at least communicated with on some level. 

Elves and Hidden people

Throughout modern day Scandinavia, Ireland, Britain, Iceland and the Faroe Islands there can still be found a great many legends and myths about what may be collectively called “hidden people”. These are the supernatural human like creatures who exist alongside the human population but are for all intents and purposes, invisible to our eyes. In Iceland the term huldufólk could easily be translated as ‘Hidden people‘.

Elves on Christmas Night

There are four Icelandic holidays considered to have a special connection with the Icelandic elves, Hulufólk or hidden people. These are New Year’s EveJanuary 6thMidsummer night and Christmas night. 
Christmas night on December 24th is the main night of the Icelandic Christmas celebration. That is the time people get together and share a Christmas meal, then they open presents. 

Elves on Midsummer Night

There are four Icelandic holidays considered to have a special connection with the Icelandic elves, Hulufólk or hidden people. These are New Year’s EveJanuary 6thMidsummer night and Christmas night.  This is the longest day of the year. The sun barely sets before rising again and the sky is blue for 24 hours. People stay up, often camping, drinking and having a good time throughout the never- ending night.

Elves on New Year's Eve

There are four Icelandic holidays considered to have a special connection with the Icelandic elves, Hulufólk or hidden people. These are New Year’s EveJanuary 6thMidsummer night and Christmas night.  
The magic of New Year’s Eve in Iceland is of course legendary. The Northern lights light up almost every night during winter and people admire them all around Iceland but this is probably the only night during the dark months of winter in Iceland when people really don’t care if the lights are due to make and appearance or not. 

Icelandic Elves on January 6th

There are four Icelandic holidays connected to the Icelandic elves, Hulufólk or hidden people. These are New Year’s EveJanuary 6thMidsummer night and Christmas night
In Iceland a special elf related festival is held on the twelfth night of Christmas or the night of January 6th. This is when legends say the Queen of the elves traditionally rides through the countryside and it is particularly perilous to be out alone on this night.